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Back to the beach!

30 Sep

Alright, it’s finally come to an end. No not my blog, though I’m sure lot’s of you thought that’s what happened. Naw. There just wasn’t much to talk about. This is after all a travel blog and when the only travel we did this summer was back to the Island twice and a quick visit to our friends on one of the gulf islands, well there really wasn’t much to tell you. We’re putting the last bits and pieces into the Dodge and will hit the road Wednesday morning, heading south once again. The roads into Baja are open but we haven’t heard much from any of our friends there, so we’re not sure what to expect. Hurricane Odile went right through there but didn’t do anywhere near as much damage as it had further south. They didn’t get through unscathed, though the city of Loreto is now trumpeting the fact that they are open for business once again, so hopefully everyone has come through safely. I’m thinking the beach is going to be pretty overgrown and it’s looking like we’ll meet up with one of the long time campers there around the first week in October. We’ll have our work cut out for us getting down the old dirt road and cutting down the weeds to be able to access our campsite, but hey, if that’s what we have to do, that’s what we have to do. Time to say a sad goodbye to our family and friends here and look forward to another 6 months in our other home in Baja California Sur, Rattlesnake Beach. When we get there, I’ll tell you all about the trip and post pictures of how things are. Take care all of you and we’ll talk again soon!

The year of the Mouse? Mosquito? Whatever…

31 Oct

The road beckoned in late September as the first hints of the coming winter, started to reveal themselves. We wished our son-in-law a Happy Birthday, kissed our daughter and grandkids goodbye, and headed for the ferry to Washington State and the road heading south.

With Rosy, our Dodge van, full to the rafters with a new fridge for Grummy, a telescope for me and many other odds and sods it was going to be a fast trip and it was. Travelling Highway 101 down the west coast till just south of San Francisco, where we swung over to I-5 we made it to our usual spot on Rattlesnake Beach in 5 ½ days.

The weather breaks

The weather was a bit rainy the first day, but after that, the sun came out and it was a beautiful trip down. If you ever get the chance, drive the 101. The scenery, from mid-Washington State to just before San Francisco, California is awesome. We’ve found over the years that the traffic is easy to deal with, as long as it’s not high summer and there are many places to stop for a walk, picnic, hike, play tourist, shop for unique gifts or just to admire the view and take a few pictures. The problems start just before you hit San Francisco, where the population density increases so drastically that we find it’s just not worth the hassle. That’s not to say that the coast road in California isn’t worth the trip, it is! The sights are great but the best part of the trip is really the dramatic views off the coast of Oregon with it’s many islands, sandy beaches, lagoons and massive erratic’s!

The rugged coast of Oregon

The rugged coast of Oregon

The Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge

Once we arrived in Baja, it was obvious that we’d come just a little too soon. The daily temperatures averaged 95 to 100F with 85% humidity. Now, I can hear all of you saying “Oh, poor you”, in a sarcastic voice, but think about that for a minute. There’s no air conditioning in our rig, no breeze to evaporate sweat and with the humidity that high, it’s like sitting in a sauna all day and night. Sweat just poured off of us as if we were standing under a steady shower and we needed to carry paper towels with us at all times to keep it out of our eyes. Even the ocean didn’t provide any respite since it’s temperature was in the high 80’s. You couldn’t even tell you had walked into it for the first couple of weeks we were here. Nudity or as close as you could come was the dress of the day.

A Mexican Horse trailer

You can tell you’ve crossed the border when you start to see things like this.

The bugs weren’t bad, a few mosquitoes, no-see-ums and fly’s, left overs from the last tropical storm that had gone by over the summer, when it had rained for 3 days straight. The government had actually sprayed due to Dengue Fever showing it’s ugly head. Other than that, it was very green and lush, looking much as it had when we left in March last year. The beach this year was actually sandy, with a lot of wood from the storms, but nothing as bad as it had been after Hurricane Paul had gone by last October.

Underneath all that wood was a beautiful sandy beach.

Underneath all that wood was a beautiful sandy beach.

2 weeks ago Tropical Storm Octave went right over us. It didn’t do much to the beach, but it did rain 6 inches in less than 24 hours and of course, once again Highway Mex1, was severely damaged in way more places than last time. See, with the Gigantes Mountain range right behind us the rain builds up there, then comes thundering down, building up speed as if heads for the Sea of Cortez. If you remember your science classes, water will always find it’s own level and even though there are many established arroyos, all it takes is a new rock or tree blocking even a partial bit of the old course, to make the water veer and start a new one. Water forced it’s way over, under and through places that had never had water before. Every time it rains for more than a couple of hours here, it’s a new lesson in hydrology with just how powerful and destructive water can be.

Here’s a little something to think about too, the desert surrounding us is so saturated, that wild, Shaggy Mane mushrooms are growing on the road into our beach. Now that’s not something you see in the Sonoran Desert much, I’m thinking!

A week after that, we had a 6.8 earthquake, centered just 65 miles due east of Loreto. Nothing unusual in that since the Sea of Cortez is actually a continuation of the San Andreas Fault. The experience for us was interesting, as we just happened to be in town that day and neither of us had ever experienced the shaking of one before, but a conversation with a kayak guide who had been out on Carmen Island made us realize how dangerous it actually was. The land around here is made up of, basically, volcanic rock, liberally laced with compressed ash. With all the rain widening any gaps, once the earth shook, rock came loose and fell. The guide said he’d gone up a hill to make a cell call, then headed back down to his guests, reaching them, just as the quake let loose. The place he’d been standing fell and he said that it was raining rocks the size of our Grumman. If he’d been on the top of the hill when the quake struck, he’d have died. Nothing like a little perspective!

And now, 2 weeks after the rain, we can’t go outside anymore. The mosquitos are so bad that even wearing 30% DEET doesn’t repel them and Dengue Fever has reared its ugly head again. Used to be, that even when the bugs were bad, it was only in the early morning or close to sunset, but not anymore, now it’s all day and night. It’s almost funny watching people do the bug dance, until you have to go outside yourself, and then it’s a misery. Even being right down at the water doesn’t keep them away!

Then there are the mice and rats. Since last years rain brought grass to the desert and this years has kept it growing, that means there are a lot of seeds to eat and in the desert if there’s an abundance of food, there will soon be an abundance of things to eat it, hence the rodents. There are millions of them and they are everywhere. We weren’t here 2 days when a rat took up residence in the engine compartment of Grummy. Thank god they can’t get inside. Richard built the van with absolutely no access to the outside using his Dad’s experience as a guide. Dodge however, wasn’t so lucky and it took us 2 weeks to get rid of the mice that had taken up residence in Rosy and the same amount of time to figure out how they were getting in. Both had not only set up housekeeping but had built nests and started raising a brood. Good thing neither of us are softies, since the idea of traps and poison didn’t even phase us. I don’t know about you, but cute as they might be, I’m not in the slightest bit interested in sharing my living space with them. Oh, and did I mention the Gopher snakes that eat rodents? Seems there’s been a population explosion amongst them too!

Yeah, I know. Bitch, bitch, bitch!

Well, I guess that saying about the snake in Paradise is really true, or maybe it’s the one about having to always pay the piper, who knows, but down here nothing ever comes easy. Ah, well, there’s certainly never a dull moment down on Rattlesnake Beach!

TTFN!

The Long Way Home

4 May

It’s not like I haven’t had access to the Internet, it’s just that I needed the extra time to acclimate to being back home in Canada. You know, doctors appointments to renew prescriptions, lab tests, more doctors appointments to discuss the results of said tests, getting all the paperwork together for ICBC refunds, new glasses and passport renewal for Richard and of course learning not to be shocked when we see the price of everything here, especially food, plus getting used to living with a very young child again. Not to mention arriving home just before the writ was dropped for a provincial election. (If you know me well, you know I’m a B.C. politics junky)

We love our grandchildren and their parents more than I can tell you, but we spend 6 months of the year basically alone. We live in a 26 foot converted Grumman truck, on a beach, where our nearest neighbours are a long ways away.

It’s quiet, for the most part, since it’s just the two of us. The steady susurration of background noise is from the wind and the waves and whatever music we might have playing.

The nearest town has a population of about 6000 and life moves at a slow but steady pace.

Our kids both live in urban settings, crowded, with the constant noise of city life: sirens, lawnmowers, leaf blowers, aircraft, vehicles, horns, etc.

It takes a little while to mesh back into the daily life of our kids and their kids. Everything is chaotic, the volume is loud, and the din is constant, from morning till night and life is lived at full speed. We forget just how fast we had to move when our daughters were little to keep up with them, their schedules and the demands of our jobs, family responsibilities and hobbies.

I finally have some quiet, alone time and figured I’d better check in with all of you.

We didn’t just drive home. We rocketed up Baja, and arrived in San Quintin on the second day of driving where we spent 2 last days, alone on the beach. It was here on the second morning that I did something I will hold near my heart for the rest of my life; I rescued a sea lion pup!

It looked like some kids had found it on the beach the night before and dragged it up into the dunes by shoving it into the sleeve of a jacket. There, they wrapped a rope around it’s rear flippers and staked the rope into the dune then left. I found it completely by accident, mostly because I could see some movement in the dunes.

I threw my jacket over its head, took the rope off it’s flippers, made sure that there was no obvious medical problems, ripped the jacket sleeve it was stuck in, in two, then followed it down to the waters edge, where it happily swam out into the surf and away. No, I don’t have pictures because I seem to never have the camera with me when something exciting happens but hey, I don’t need any pictures to remind me of just what a great feeling it was to see that little fellow head out to the safety of the ocean.

Then we headed for SoCal. Our destination, El Centro!

After that it was just travelling and visiting so many places, that they all seem to run into one another. We toured southeastern California, southern Arizona and New Mexico, stopping at anything that looked interesting.

The most fun we had was visiting our friends Jay and Diane, who own a small spread just outside of Albuquerque and raise Mules. We spend a lot of time together in Baja and have been trying to get to New Mexico to visit for a few years now.

We didn’t get to meet the mules as they were still down in their winter range and there were chores that needed to be accomplished before they could come home. Richard and I, (I hope) helped with the burning off of the vegetation in their irrigation canal, then with the flooding of the fields. They wined us, dined us, acted as our personal tour guides and made us feel like part of the family. Considering that we arrived on their doorstep about 5 minutes after they drove in made it all the more special.

Like all good visitors, we knew when to leave and after 3 days we hit the road again, getting home in less than 3 days.

There’s no point in telling you about all the places we visited, so I’ll just show you.

 On one side of our parking spot there were hundreds of these buggies, quads, and bikes. This is the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area of Southeastern California

On one side of our parking spot there were hundreds of these buggies, quads, and bikes. This is the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area of Southeastern California

On the other side of our parking spot was this Fashion shoot. You know you're in California when ...

On the other side of our parking spot was this Fashion shoot. You know you’re in California when …

The Solar observatory at Kitts Peak National Observatory. One of 26 different telescopes on site

The Solar observatory at Kitts Peak National Observatory. One of 26 different telescopes on site

More telescopes. There are 8 different Astronomical Research Institutions represented on this 6800 foot mountain peak that sits on the Tohono O'odham reserve in southern Arizona

More telescopes. There are 8 different Astronomical Research Institutions represented on this 6800 foot mountain peak that sits on the Tohono O’odham reserve in southern Arizona

A copy of Sputnik hanging in the Alamogordo Space Museum. We travelled through the White Sands National Monument, Alamogordo and Roswell. Sort of following the birth of the Nuclear Age, SciFi and the space race.

A copy of Sputnik hanging in the Alamogordo Space Museum. We travelled through the White Sands National Monument, Alamogordo and Roswell. Sort of following the birth of the Nuclear Age, SciFi and the space race.

A copy of Goddard's very first successful rocket launched in 1926

A copy of Goddard’s very first successful rocket launched in 1926

A lava flow in El Malpais. (The Bad Land) New Mexico's  Northwestern third of the state is covered in abundant, well-exposed, and un-eroded volcanic landforms. makes for some pretty cool landscapes.

A lava flow in El Malpais. (The Bad Land) New Mexico’s Northwestern third of the state is covered in abundant, well-exposed, and un-eroded volcanic landforms. makes for some pretty cool landscapes.Does this look familiar to you? Are you a Jody Foster fan? The movie "Contact" was partially filmed here. This is the Karl G. Jansky,Very Large Array. It's a Radio Astronomy Observatory, meaning it listens to space. It was in the perfect position when we arrived for some really good shots. Each dish can be moved, though they are massive and sometimes they are spread over a vast area called the Plains of Saint Agustin, about 50 miles west of Socorro, New MexicoDoes this look familiar to you? Are you a Jody Foster fan? The movie “Contact” was partially filmed here. This is the Karl G. Jansky,Very Large Array. It’s a Radio Astronomy Observatory, meaning it listens to space. It was in the perfect position when we arrived for some really good shots. Each dish can be moved, though they are massive and sometimes they are spread over a vast area called the Plains of Saint Agustin, about 50 miles west of Socorro, New Mexico

Part of a wall in a place called El Morro National Monument. It's juxtaposed to the one below it. It's a watering hole that's had people stopping by for centuries and each has left some graffiti of the time.

Part of a wall in a place called El Morro National Monument. It’s juxtaposed to the one below it. It’s a watering hole that’s had people stopping by for centuries and each has left some graffiti of the time.

Much older petroglyphs on the walls in El Morro.

Much older petroglyphs on the walls in El Morro.Pueblaon ruins that sit at the very top of El Morro and vacant by the time the Spanish arrived in the late 1500's. They could see 360 degrees around them, for a very great distance. Good defensive position.Pueblaon ruins that sit at the very top of El Morro and vacant by the time the Spanish arrived in the late 1500’s. They could see 360 degrees around them, for a very great distance. Good defensive position.We came around a corner in downtown Santa Fe, drawn by the music, where this, not so little guy, was in standing in the middle of the passage.

We came around a corner in downtown Santa Fe, drawn by the music, where this, not so little guy, was in standing in the middle of the passage.
This was the music that got our attention. It was calypso with a little Spanish flair. This sort of thing was everywhere we went in the downtown area.

This was the music that got our attention. It was calypso with a little Spanish flair. This sort of thing was everywhere we went in the downtown area.

It was a great trip, interesting, educational, fun, with fabulous food, wonderful friends and spectacular scenery. We can hardly wait to do it again. There were so many places we didn’t go and lots of things we didn’t do. Gives us a damn good reason for going back again don’t you think?

Incommunicado, so to speak.

4 Oct

Just wanted to let you all know, that we’re on the road.

Actually, right now, we’re sitting at the top of Tejon Pass, getting ready to head down into the Los Angeles basin. I will post a much longer story once we get to our favourite beach, since trying to find Broad Band WiFi is almost impossible down here.

Every where we go in Canada, we see people with their I Phones, I Touches, Blackberries etc, and every place has signs advertising their WiFi, but not down here. Haven’t seen one single person doing anything but using their cell phones and haven’t seen a single sign anywhere for WiFi. The best we could do is stop at a FLYING J Travel centre and use the truckers internet. Even for these guys, the places charge $4.95 for 24 hours usage.

I guess Canadians really are more advanced electronically, then our neighbours to the south. Oh, well.

I’m going to vent about one of my pet peeves when I post so be prepared, it has to do with politicians and naming things, just to give you a hint.

So, TTFN!

OVER ON THE ISLAND

12 Aug

When I worked as a fishing guide in Campbell River, I got asked a lot of questions about a lot of things. Many of them were about the area and the island itself. Now, as I’ve been known to say over the years, my brain is full of useless trivia, (I’m a wiz at Trivial Pursuits) and I always loved history, so I made sure I had as much of the information available to offer up as possible.

She is one of the best reasons for visiting the island

“How big is it?” “Well, it’s 460 kilometres (290 mi) long and 80 kilometres (50 mi)wide at its widest point.

“Where did the names come from?” “Most  of the places around here are named after the original Spanish explorers and the members of the crews of 3 English ships. George Vancouver’s HMS Discovery and HMS Chatham which explored the waters of Vancouver Island from 1791 to 1794. Then in 1859, the cartography ship  HMS Plumper arrived to chart the Island.

Since the Spanish had been on the island since 1774, part of Vancouver’s job was negotiating with the Spanish Commander of the Nootka Sound settlement, Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra. They got on well and Vancouver decided to honour a request from him to commemorate their friendly meetings by giving the island the name of Quadra and Vancouver Island, though as you can tell, over the years the name has been shortened and Quadra’s name was given to another island.”

“What’s the tallest mountain?” “The Golden Hinde; it’s the highest peak in the Vancouver Island Range, (Stupid name, right?) They run down the centre of the island like a backbone.”

“Golden Hind, isn’t that a deer?” No, that was the name of Sir Francis Drake’s ship.” “Oh”.

Kid and grandkid walking on Sidney Pier

“Sure is pretty. Does it rain much?” “Depending on where you are the amount of rainfall can be as high as 260 inches per year, the highest in North America, or as low as 24 inches in Victoria, the largest city and capital of British Columbia.This is after all a Temperate Rain forest”

“260 INCHES!!” “Yep, but we generally only get about 100 inches per year here.” (meaning Campbell River)That’s why it’s so green here.”

“What are real estate prices like here?”   “Whoa, if you want to buy property here, you need to come back in February.”

“February, why February? Is that some sort of weird Canadian thing? Are you only allowed to buy land in February?”

“No, you can buy land here anytime, but you need to come in February to see if you really want to buy!”     “What’s so special about February then?”

“Well, you know we were talking about the rain and how pretty and green things are around here?”     “Yeah.”

“February is when it rains the worst. Not necessarily the most, but the worst.” “Waddaya mean?”

“February is the grey month, when the wind is blowing a South easter at about 50 miles per hour and the rain is coming down in sheets sideways and it’s been doing that for 2 straight weeks! The sky is grey, the land is grey and the people are grey. So if you can stand living here in February, then you can stand it during the good months!”

“My Wife hates the rain, but it sure is pretty!”

Does this look like somewhere you'd like to visit?

And it is. In most months it’s green, verdant, lush and down around the bottom of the island, with it’s Mediterranean  climate, during Summer and Fall, it’s full to the brim with gardens; flower, fruit and vegetable. Everywhere, there are street markets, outdoor entertainment, food vendors, and produce stands. In some ways it reminds me of a scene out of  Medieval times, just sans costume.

Finally, I get to view the island from another angle. No longer a resident, but a visitor. To be sure, a knowledgable visitor, but now a visitor none the less. From this view, the place fairly vibrates with energy. (Nice segue, don’t you think?)

We came to visit our friends and family, and it’s been fun. We’re staying with our youngest and her family. My daughter is a food blogger and a chef. She develops recipes and believes in organic, whole, raw foods. She’s also a calorie counter, so we eat low calorie, healthy, great tasting food, most of which they grow themselves. They even raise their own meat and egg chickens. Some of which just went to the butcher yesterday. Mmmm, real free range chicken!

The survivors. These are the egg layers, the meat birds went into the freezer on Tuesday!

One cannot live on chicken alone, however. My son-in-law loves to fish but since they moved to Saanich he hasn’t been able to take their little lake boat out, so they came up with a brand new plan.

The town of Sidney, is about 20 miles north of Victoria, on the Saanich peninsula. At one time this sleepy little village was on the verge of decrepitude, but over the last 20 years has been reborn into a vibrant and interesting tourist destination. One of the things the town did to reinvent itself was to build a fishing pier. Now this is nothing new, Campbell River built the worlds first saltwater fishing pier many years ago and you really can catch all of the different species of salmon from it.

The Sidney pier doesn’t cut it as a “fishing” pier, as there are no big salmon runs nearby and except for a few small bullheads, nothing much in the way of piscatorial action happens there. Though, as a crabbing pier it’s perfect! It sits out over protected, shallow waters that have low tidal action. The bottom under the pier is perfect for the wandering, feeding crabs and it’s easy to put crab pots in and retrieve them. It’s also rather pretty.

All ready for crabbing

This was the new plan and armed with a crab trap, rope, bucket, bait, regulations and license, not to mention spouse and kids, off they went to catch crab from the pier and damned if they weren’t successful. Mostly they catch Red Rock crab, but once in a while they luck out and get a Dungeness. We’ve been off doing it together and I can see that it’s going to become habit forming for them, at least as long as the weather allows.

So here we are, eating fresh vegetables and chickens they raised themselves, fresh crab we caught and surrounded by fruit just waiting to be picked. (Blackberry, Salmonberry, Thimbleberry, Apples, Plums, Pears, Figs, even Walnuts)

Success! Mmmmm tasty!

Good friends, loving family, reasonable weather and great food, it doesn’t get much better than this!

The lazy, hazy days of summer?

10 Jun

I know, I know, I’ve been remiss. I haven’t posted anything for  a while and I’m feeling guilty, but I haven’t really done anything of note or gone anywhere except back and forth to the island. I’ve been busy, helping my youngest daughter with the kids while her husband is away at a conference.   Richard has stayed behind in Penticton helping  the other daughter to build a new fence. We’re kind of boring right now, though we are having fun playing with the grandkids!

Don’t worry though, I’ll be posting next week. I’ll let you know my views on the ferry system, what one does all day long to entertain a 12 month old, a 18 month old, and a 3 year old, plus I intend to do a little flitting about while I’m here, so I’ll post a few shots of the beauty of Vancouver Island.

Talk to you soon! Keep your chin up, Summer’s got to come eventually!

The Illusion of Time

1 Jun

Out on a drive today, on our way to return a borrowed item, we started to talk about how much time we had left up here and how it should be parcelled out. Wow, who knew how busy our lives would become, after we retired!

Yeah, I know how trite that sounds. You’ve heard it said on a thousand ads aimed at the retired crowd in hopes of separating them from some of their money. But it seems, in our case to be true, even when we strive to reach the exact opposite. Life conspires against us, or so it seems. Or maybe it’s just our desire to spend as much time as possible with each of our daughters and their families.

Just another Island lake.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I love the Island, most of the people I love  live there.  It’s beyond beautiful. I just can’t take the climate anymore. It rains a lot, that’s why it’s so verdant and green. It’s also cold; coastal influence, you know. This makes me sad as I grew up and spent the better part of my adult life on the waters of the Northern Pacific Ocean, but when I say I can’t stand the cold anymore I mean it. If the temperature drops below  21C or 72F and the air is damp, I start to seize up and suffer from pain in my joints. Hence the reason why Baja was a no brainer when it came to where to spend our winters. The problem comes with where to spend our summers and what to do while we’re back in Canada.

Me, back in my working days.

I miss not seeing views like this regularly anymore!

Our kids and their families are very important to us and we want to spend as much time with each one as we can, but therein lies the problem. One lives on Vancouver Island, in the temperate rain forest, the other lives in Penticton, an arid, fruit growing area, in the desert interior of BC, about 400 km from the island. Plus it requires a ferry ride every time we wish to get on or off the island. A not inexpensive ferry ride, especially when we’re towing the dingy.

Our doctor also lives on the island, so we spend a lot of time going back and forth, visiting with our relatives and friends and lately, seeing the doctor a little more often as minor and a few major medical problems have crept up, lo these last couple of years.

We also eventually, go a little stir crazy. We’re used to being on our own a lot, way down the path less travelled, so getting back to civilization,  all the people and noise start to wear after a while and we need to get away. A couple of years ago, it was a trip around Alberta, this year we’re heading to the Arlington Air Show, just south of the border in Washington State. That’s after I go to the island for 2 weeks to help my youngest daughter while her husband is at a conference, get a medical test done, see my doctor, visit with my sister and maybe get up island to see a few friends. Then back to Penticton, where Richard will be in the process of building a wooden privacy fence along the back of the kids yard.

Some of the land around Penticton

We will then get into Grummy and head back over to the island again so Richard can have a visit with everyone, then back to Penticton as it’s easier to get to Arlington from there.

While we’re doing all this to and froing, there are repairs to the Grummy and our little Asuna that must be undertaken, plus re-provisioning of supplies and spare parts that we can’t get in Mexico. There are jobs we undertake for the kids, that they don’t have the time or expertise to do, as well as babysit once in a while to give the kids a night out, alone. Add in when we light out on our own for a while, and the time seems to fly. There never seems to be enough to go around before we realize it’s time to start thinking about heading south again.

According to Einstein’s  Theory of Relativity, the passage of time in a faster moving reference frame is slower than the passage of time in a slower moving reference frame. That means that if you were standing on the event horizon of a black hole, even though movement of energy is tremendously fast, time for you would be passing very slowly. Now I don’t have the qualifications to argue with Einstein, but it always feels to us as if the exact opposite were true. Time spent in civilization where everyone seems to be moving at the speed of light, moves so fast for us, that we feel like we’ve only just arrived somewhere, when it’s time to leave again. Time spent on the beach in Baja, where civilization such as we know it seems to be a million miles away, slides by  so slowly  that when it’s  time to leave, it almost comes as a surprise.